SATURDAY MORNING AG WRAP: Prices, Eggs, Hay, Milk, and Cattle on Feed

The average price received by farmers for corn during March in Iowa was $3.43 per bushel according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Agricultural Prices report.  This was up $0.04 from the February price, but $0.03 below March 2016.

The March 2017 average price received by farmers for soybeans, at $9.58 per bushel, was down $0.13 from the February price, but $1.12 above the March 2016 price.

The March average oat price per bushel was $3.20, up $0.12 from February, and $0.37 above March 2016.

All hay prices in Iowa averaged $80.00 per ton in March. This was down $7.00 from the February price, and $18.00 less than March 2016.  The March 2017 alfalfa hay price averaged $84.00, down $6.00 from February, and $18.00 below March 2016. The average price received for other hay during March was $68.00 per ton. This was down $8.00 from the February price, and $14.00 lower than last year.

The average price was $17.70 per cwt for milk, down $1.50 from the February price, but $2.20 above one year ago.  Milk cow replacements averaged $1,600 as of April 1, 2017.

CHICKENS & EGGS

Iowa egg production during March 2017 was 1.37 billion eggs, up 10 percent from last month, and up 28 percent from last year, according to the latest Chickens and Eggs report from the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.

The average number of all layers on hand during March 2017 was 55.4 million, down 1 percent from last month, but up 16 percent from last year. Eggs per 100 layers for March were 2,466, up 11 percent from last month, and up 11 percent from last year.

MILK PRODUCTION

Milk production in Iowa during March 2017 totaled 444 million pounds, up 2 percent from the previous March according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Milk Production report. The average number of milk cows during March, at 216,000 head, was the same as last month, but 4,000 more than last year.  Monthly production per cow averaged 2,055 pounds, up 10 pounds from last March.
CATTLE ON FEED

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Iowa feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 670,000 head on April 1, 2017, according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Cattle on Feed report.  This was up 3 percent from March 1, 2017, and up 5 percent from April 1, 2016.  Iowa feedlots with a capacity of less than 1,000 head had 610,000 head on feed, up 2 percent from last month but down 3 percent from last year. Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in all Iowa feedlots totaled 1,280,000 head, up 2 percent from last month and up 1 percent from last year.

Placements of cattle and calves in Iowa feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during March totaled 116,000 head, an increase of 14 percent from last month and up 23 percent from last year.  Feedlots with a capacity of less than 1,000 head placed 70,000 head, up 19 percent from last month and up 43 percent from last year.  Placements for all feedlots in Iowa totaled 186,000 head, up 16 percent from last month and up 30 percent from last year.

Marketings of fed cattle from Iowa feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during March totaled 93,000 head, up 4 percent from last month and up 15 percent from last year.  Feedlots with a capacity of less than 1,000 head marketed 56,000 head, up 33 percent from last month but unchanged from last year.  Marketings for all feedlots in Iowa were 149,000 head, up 14 percent from last month and up 9 percent from last year.  Other disappearance from all feedlots in Iowa totaled 7,000 head.

HAY COUNTY ESTIMATES

ALFALFA:  The Northeast District was Iowa’s largest alfalfa dry hay producing district in 2016 with 522,200 tons according to estimates released by the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service.  The South Central District was second with 405,500 tons.

Dubuque County was the largest alfalfa dry hay producing county with 98,200 tons produced of the published counties.  Clayton, Jackson, Winneshiek, and Allamakee rounded out the top five.

Lyon led all published counties with an average yield of 5.70 tons per acre.  Clay, Dubuque, Fayette, and Clayton rounded out the top five.  Other counties producing more than 5.00 tons per acre were Howard and Monona.

Area counties saw Winnebago with 2,690 tons, Worth 6,700, Wright 3.550, Cerro Gordo 4,370, Humboldt 2,630, and Hancock County did not report.

OTHER HAY:  The South Central District was Iowa’s largest producer of dry hay other than alfalfa in 2016 with 331,400 tons.  The Southeast District was second with 136,600 tons.

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