SATURDAY MORNING AG WRAP: Prospective Planting, Hogs, Prices, Grains, and Labor Reports Are Out

Iowa farmers intend to plant 13.3 million acres of corn for all purposes in 2017 according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Prospective Plantings report.  This is a decrease of 600,000 acres from 2016 and, if realized, would be the lowest planted acreage since 2008.

Producers intend to plant 10.1 million acres of soybeans in Iowa this year.  This is a 600,000 acre increase from 2016.  If realized, this would be the largest planted acreage since 2006.

Iowa farmers intend to plant 135,000 acres of oats for all purposes, up 15,000 acres from last year.

Farmers in Iowa expect to harvest 1.0 million acres of all dry hay for the 2017 crop year. This is 90,000 acres more than harvested in 2016.

Planted acres of winter wheat, at 25,000 acres, is unchanged from last year.

The Prospective Plantings report provides the first official, survey-based estimates of U.S. farmers’ 2017 planting intentions.  NASS’s acreage estimates are based on surveys conducted during the first two weeks of March from a sample of more than 84,000 farm operators across the United States with more than 2,900 from Iowa.  Actual plantings will depend upon weather, economic conditions and the availability of production inputs at the time producers make their final planting decisions.

In the United States, corn planted area for all purposes in 2017 is estimated at 90.0 million acres, down 4 percent or 4.0 million acres from last year. Compared with last year, planted acreage is expected to be down or unchanged in 38 of the 48 estimating States.

Soybean planted area for 2017 is estimated at a record high 89.5 million acres, up 7 percent from last year. Compared with last year, planted acreage intentions are up or unchanged in 27 of the 31 estimating States.

All wheat planted area for 2017 is estimated at 46.1 million acres, down 8 percent from 2016. This represents the lowest total planted area for the United States since records began in 1919. The 2017 winter wheat planted area, at 32.7 million acres, is down 9 percent from last year but up 1 percent from the previous estimate. Of this total, about 23.8 million acres are Hard Red Winter, 5.53 million acres are Soft Red Winter, and 3.38 million acres are White Winter. Area planted to other spring wheat for 2017 is estimated at 11.3 million acres, down 3 percent from 2016. Of this total, about 10.6 million acres are Hard Red Spring wheat. The intended Durum planted area for 2017 is estimated at 2.00 million acres, down 17 percent from the previous year.

Hogs

On March 1, 2017, there were 21.8 million hogs and pigs on Iowa farms, according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Hogs and Pigs report.  The March 1 inventory was down 3 percent from the previous quarter but up 8 percent from the previous year.

The December 2016-February 2017 quarterly pig crop was 5.70 million head, down 7 percent from the previous quarter but 7 percent above last year.  A total of 530,000 sows farrowed during this quarter.  The average pigs saved per litter was 10.75 for the December-February quarter, down from 10.90 the previous quarter.

As of March 1, producers planned to farrow 520,000 sows and gilts in the March-May quarter and 525,000 head during the June-August quarter.
United States inventory of all hogs and pigs on March 1, 2017 was 71.0 million head. This was up 4 percent from March 1, 2016, but down 1 percent from December 1, 2016.

Breeding inventory, at 6.07 million head, was up 1 percent from last year, but down slightly from the previous quarter.

Market hog inventory, at 64.9 million head, was up 4 percent from last year, but down 1 percent from last quarter.

The December 2016-February 2017 pig crop, at 31.4 million head, was up 4 percent  from 2016. Sows farrowing during this period totaled 3.01 million head, up 3 percent from 2016. The sows farrowed during this quarter represented 49 percent of the breeding herd. The average pigs saved per litter was a record high of 10.43 for the December-February period, compared to 10.30 last year. Pigs saved per litter by size of operation ranged from 8.00 for operations with 1-99 hogs and pigs to 10.50 for operations with more than 5,000 hogs and pigs.

United States hog producers intend to have 3.01 million sows farrow during the March-May 2017 quarter, up 1 percent from the actual farrowings during the same period in 2016, and up 5 percent from 2015. Intended farrowings for June-August 2017, at 3.05 million sows, are down slightly from 2016, but up 1 percent from 2015.

The total number of hogs under contract owned by operations with over 5,000 head, but raised by contractees, accounted for 48 percent of the total United States hog inventory, the same as previous year

Prices

The average price received by farmers for corn during February in Iowa was $3.39 per bushel according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Agricultural Prices report.  This was up $0.05 from the January price, but $0.09 below February 2016.

The February 2017 average price received by farmers for soybeans, at $9.71 per bushel, up $0.13 from the January price, and $1.35 above the February 2016 price.

The February average oat price per bushel was $3.08, up $0.08 from January, and $0.67 above February 2016.

All hay prices in Iowa averaged $87.00 per ton in February. This was down $2.00 from the January price, and $15.00 less than February 2016.  The February 2017 alfalfa hay price averaged $90.00, down $4.00 from January, and $17.00 below February 2016. The average price received for other hay during February was $76.00 per ton. This was down $4.00 from the January price, and $7.00 lower than last year.

The average price was $19.20 per cwt for milk, unchanged from the January price, but $3.60 above one year ago.

Labor

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will conduct its biannual Agricultural Labor Survey during the second half of April. The survey will collect information about hired labor from more than 440 Iowa farmers and ranchers. “The beginning of the year is the time when agricultural producers plan out the rest of their growing seasons and is a great time to assess on-farm labor needs,” said Greg Thessen, Director of the NASS Upper Midwest Region.  “The data that farm operators provide through NASS’s Agricultural Labor Survey helps federal policymakers base labor policies on accurate information.”  USDA and the U.S. Department of Labor will use statistics gathered in the Agricultural Labor Survey to establish minimum wage rates for agricultural workers, administer farm labor recruitment and placement service programs, and assist legislators in determining labor policies.   In the survey, NASS asks participants to answer a variety of questions about hired farm labor on their operations, including total number of hired farm workers, the average hours worked, and wage rates paid for the weeks of January 8-14 and April 9-15. For their convenience, survey participants have the option to respond online.   “By asking about two separate time periods each of the two times we collect data during the year, we are able to publish quarterly data and capture seasonal variation,” said Thessen. “This approach helps us ensure that anyone using our data can conduct more accurate analyses.”  NASS will publish survey results in the May 18 Farm Labor report. This and all NASS reports are available online at www.nass.usda.gov.

Grains

Iowa corn stocks in all positions on March 1, 2017, totaled 1.71 billion bushels, up 12 percent from March 1, 2016, according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Grain Stocks report. This is the largest amount of corn in storage on March 1 since 1988.  Of the total stocks, 58 percent were stored on-farm. The December 2016-February 2017 indicated disappearance totaled 690 million bushels, 5 percent above the 655 million bushels used during the same period last year.

Iowa soybeans stored in all positions on March 1, 2017, totaled 310 million bushels, down 6 percent from the 328 million bushels on hand March 1, 2016.  Of the total stocks, 37 percent were stored on-farm.  Indicated disappearance for December 2016-February 2017 is 148 million bushels, 16 percent more than the 127 million bushels used during the same quarter last year.

Iowa oats stored on-farm totaled 960 thousand bushels, down 4 percent from March 1, 2016.

Corn stocks in all positions on March 1, 2017 totaled 8.62 billion bushels, up 10 percent from March 1, 2016. Of the total stocks, 4.91 billion bushels were stored on farms, up 13 percent from a year earlier. Off-farm stocks, at 3.71 billion bushels, are up 6 percent from a year ago. The December 2016-February 2017 indicated disappearance is 3.77 billion bushels, compared with 3.41 billion bushels during the same period last year.

Soybeans stored in all positions on March 1, 2017 totaled 1.73 billion bushels, up 13 percent from March 1, 2016. Soybean stocks stored on farms are estimated at 669 million bushels, down 8 percent from a year ago. Off-farm stocks, at 1.07 billion bushels, are up 33 percent from last March. Indicated disappearance for the December 2016February 2017 quarter totaled 1.16 billion bushels, down 2 percent from the same period a year earlier.

All wheat stored in all positions on March 1, 2017 totaled 1.66 billion bushels, up 21 percent from a year ago. On-farm stocks are estimated at 350 million bushels, up 9 percent from last March. Off-farm stocks, at 1.31 billion bushels, are up 24 percent from a year ago. The December 2016-February 2017 indicated disappearance is 422 million bushels, 13 percent above the same period a  year earlier.

Leave a Reply

*