SATURDAY MORNING AG WRAP: Chickens, Cattle, Milk, and Honey

Milk production in Iowa during February 2017 totaled 399 million pounds, up 1 percent from the previous February according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Milk Production report. However, production was up 5 percent when adjusted for the leap year. The average number of milk cows during February, at 216,000 head, was 1,000 more than last month, and 5,000 more than last year.  Monthly production per cow averaged 1,845 pounds, down 25 pounds from last February.

Milk production in the 23 major States during February totaled 15.7 billion pounds, down 1.0 percent from February 2016. However, production was 2.5 percent above last year after adjusting for the leap year. January revised production, at 17.0 billion pounds, was up 2.7 percent from January 2016.  The January revision represented a decrease of 4 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,801 pounds for February, 32 pounds below February 2016.

The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.69 million head, 66,000 head more than February 2016, and 3,000 head more than January 2017.

Milk production in the United States during February totaled 16.7 billion pounds, down 1.2 percent from February 2016. However, production was 2.3 percent above last year after adjusting for the leap year.

Production per cow in the United States averaged 1,782 pounds for February, 33 pounds below February 2016.

The number of milk cows on farms in the United States was 9.37 million head, 56,000 head more than February 2016, and 4,000 head more than January 2017.

Iowa egg production during February 2017 was 1.24 billion eggs, down 10 percent from last month, but up 33 percent from last year, according to the latest Chickens and Eggs report from the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.

The average number of all layers on hand during February 2017 was 55.8 million, up slightly from last month, and up 24 percent from last year. Eggs per 100 layers for February were 2,220, down 11 percent from last month, but up 8 percent from last year.

United States egg production totaled 8.10 billion during February 2017, up 2 percent from last year. Production included 7.08 billion table eggs, and 1.02 billion hatching eggs, of which 941 million were broiler-type and 74.7 million were egg-type. The total number of layers during February 2017 averaged 375 million, up 3 percent from last year. February egg production per 100 layers was 2,157 eggs, down 2 percent from February 2016.           All layers in the United States on March 1, 2017 totaled 375 million, up 2 percent from last year. The 375 million layers consisted of 317 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 55.1 million layers producing broilertype hatching eggs, and 3.43 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on March 1, 2017, averaged 76.9 eggs per 100 layers, up 1 percent from March 1, 2016.

Egg-type chicks hatched during February 2017 totaled 48.2 million, down 5 percent from February 2016. Eggs in incubators totaled 51.5 million on March 1, 2017, up 2 percent from a year ago.

Domestic placements of egg-type pullet chicks for future hatchery supply flocks by leading breeders totaled 180 thousand during February 2017, down 5 percent from February 2016.

Broiler-type chicks hatched during February 2017 totaled 730 million, down 2 percent from February 2016. Eggs in incubators totaled 667 million on March 1, 2017, up 3 percent from a year ago.

Leading breeders placed 7.83 million broiler-type pullet chicks for future domestic hatchery supply flocks during February 2017, down 3 percent from February 2016.
Honey production from producers with 5 or more colonies in Iowa totaled 1.78 million pounds in 2016 according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service Honey report. This was a 1 percent decrease from the 1.80 million pounds produced in 2015. The number of honey producing colonies in the state rose from 36,000 colonies in 2015 to 37,000 colonies in 2016. This number does not include producers with fewer than 5 colonies or producers who did not harvest honey. Colonies that produced honey in more than one state were counted in each state where they produced honey. Yield per colony in Iowa averaged 48 pounds, down from 50 pounds per colony in 2015. Iowa moved to nineteenth place nationally in honey production, down from eighteenth place in 2015.

On December 15, 2016, producer honey stocks in Iowa, excluding stocks under government loan programs, were 746 million pounds, a 25 percent decrease from 2015. The state’s 2016 honey crop was valued at $3.68 million, down 7 percent from the previous year’s $3.96 million. The average price per pound for all marketing channels in Iowa was $2.07, down 13 cents from 2015.

United States honey production in 2016 from producers with five or more colonies totaled 162 million pounds, up 3 percent from 2015. There were 2.78 million colonies from which honey was harvested in 2016, up 4 percent from 2015. Yield of honey harvested per colony averaged 58.3 pounds, down 1 percent from the 58.9 pounds in 2015. Colonies which produced honey in more than one State were counted in each State where the honey was produced. Therefore, at the United States level yield per colony may be understated, but total production would not be impacted. Colonies were not included if honey was not harvested. Producer honey stocks were 41.3 million pounds on December 15, 2016, down 2 percent from a year earlier. Stocks held by producers exclude those held under the commodity loan program.

United States honey production in 2016 from producers with less than five colonies totaled 766 thousand pounds, up 6 percent from 2015. There were 24 thousand colonies from which honey was harvested in 2016, up 4 percent from 2015. The average yield was 31.9 pounds per colony in 2016, up 2 percent from the previous year. This yield is 26.4 pounds less than what was harvested per colony on operations with five or more colonies.

United States honey prices decreased during 2016 to 207.5 cents per pound, down slightly from 208.3 cents per pound in 2015. United States and State level prices reflect the portions of honey sold through cooperatives, private, and retail channels. Prices for each color class are derived by weighting the quantities sold for each marketing channel. Prices for the 2015 crop reflect honey sold in 2015 and 2016. Some 2015 honey was sold in 2016, which caused some revisions to the 2015 honey prices. Price data was not collected for operations with less than five colonies.

For operations with five or more colonies, the average prices paid in 2016 for honey bee queens, packages, and nucs were $19, $89, and $117 respectively. The average prices paid in 2016 for operations with less than five colonies were $33 per queen, $109 per package, and $122 per nuc. Comparable data is not available for 2015. For operations with five more colonies, pollination income for 2016 was $338 million, down 1 percent from 2015. Other income from honey bees for operations with five or more colonies in 2016 was $149 million, down 10 percent from 2015.

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Iowa feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 650,000 head on March 1, 2017, according to the latest USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service – Cattle on Feed report.  This was up 2 percent from February 1, 2017, and up 3 percent from March 1, 2016.  Iowa feedlots with a capacity of less than 1,000 head had 600,000 head on feed, up 3 percent from last month but down 6 percent from last year. Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in all Iowa feedlots totaled 1,250,000 head, up 2 percent from last month but down 2 percent from last year.

Placements of cattle and calves in Iowa feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during February totaled 102,000 head, a decrease of 20 percent from last month but up 11 percent from last year.  Feedlots with a capacity of less than 1,000 head placed 59,000 head, down 27 percent from last month and down 20 percent from last year.  Placements for all feedlots in Iowa totaled 161,000 head, down 23 percent from last month and down 3 percent from last year.

Marketings of fed cattle from Iowa feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during February totaled 89,000 head, up 3 percent from last month and up 14 percent from last year.  Feedlots with a capacity of less than 1,000 head marketed 42,000 head, down 19 percent from last month and last year.  Marketings for all feedlots in Iowa were 131,000 head, down 5 percent from last month but up 1 percent from last year.  Other disappearance from all feedlots in Iowa totaled 5,000 head.

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.8 million head on March 1, 2017. The inventory was slightly above March 1, 2016.

Placements in feedlots during February totaled 1.69 million head, 1 percent below 2016. Net placements were 1.64 million head. During February, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 315,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 330,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 490,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 395,000, 900-999 pounds were 124,000, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 40,000 head.

Marketings of fed cattle during February totaled 1.65 million head, 4 percent above 2016.

Other disappearance totaled 56,000 head during February, 3 percent below 2016.

Leave a Reply

*